• Mindfull

    Mindful is a plate and bowl set whose form and weight are designed to alter our perception of the amount of food contained. The aim is to aid in portion control and thus help maintain healthy eating habits. Our levels of fullness are strongly influenced by our memory. If we think we have eaten a large portion, then we feel full; even if we are being deceived. 

  • Washing Up Fun

    This project aims to engage intrinsic motivation rather than extrinsic motivation when doing chores. If washing up is only done for ‘pocket money’, then as soon as the reward is removed the chore is avoided. In fact, because it is seen as something that is done to get something extra, it is avoided even more than if a reward had never been associated with it. This design tries to make the process fun. Then the task itself becomes desirable and positive associations are established with the task.


    This project comes from the Design Psychology paper I teach at Victoria University.


    By Jessica Johnston, Holly Macdonald, Chelsea Porter, Jessica Johnston, Laura Wainohu

  • Table Talk

    Cell phones can be disruptive during interactions; especially if one person's focus is on their phone, rather than the people they are with. However, phones can also be very social: sharing photos, videos or news with those you are with. The aim of this table is to force phone use to be social with the people you are with physically. The concept is when your phone is out near the table the screen is displayed on the table for those you are with to see. This is great for sharing information, but discourages interactions which exclude the people you are with.
      This project comes from the Design Psychology paper I teach at Victoria University.
    By Thomas Stonehouse, Jennifer Currie, Amy Young, Julia Loach, Lin Chen
  • Blobbin’ Bin

    This bin helps children pay attention to and encourage tidy rubbish habits. The interaction makes it fun to throw things away encouraging the behaviour. The form of the bin is cute, and cute forms help subconsciously increase human attention and awareness. This phenomenon is called the kawaii effect and likely evolved as a way of ensuring the safety of our young.
    This project comes from the Design Psychology paper I teach at Victoria University.
    By Emma Fawcett, Meg Brodie, Simeon Wilson, Andrew Todd
  • Something fishy

    The fishbowl ashtray is a critical design object intended to discourage smoking through persuasion and cognitive dissonance. Forcing both the desire for smoking and the desire not to hurt the fish to be foremost in the mind.
    This project comes from the Design Psychology paper I teach at Victoria University.
    By Mata Freshwater, Joy Wittington
  • Teres Wine Glass

    Our perception can be deceived which is useful if we want to trick ourselves into healthier habits. This wine glass plays with two parts of our perception, making it feel like we are drinking more than we are. The shape of the glass makes it visually seem that there is more wine than there is. Likewise, water in the bottom part of the glass adds to the overall weight, tricking us into the same conclusion. The bottom glass with water also aims to help us keep up a steady intake of water while drinking.
    This project comes from the Design Psychology paper I teach at Victoria University.
    By Ollie Evill, Martin Lim, Rochelle Harris, Son Tran and Rongotai Bevans
  • Subtlety

    Memory is strongly linked to environment; recall of memories is significantly better if it is in the same environment where the learning took place.  This is also true for emotional states. When taking an exam, the emotional discomfort and frustration is often greater than when studying. This chair aims to create discomfort and frustration while studying to better replicate the exam conditions.  It is larger than average to make the user feel smaller and less significant, the seat drops slightly when first "sat on" inducing a slight sense of fear, and the seat stays at a slight angle down causing the user to slip off slightly, encouraging a sense of frustration.
  • The Perceptionists (EGG)

    This project investigates surprise and our perception of taste, probing how colour texture and presentation change how we taste food.
    This project comes from the Design Psychology paper I teach at Victoria University.

    Andrei Rotar, Georgia Sullivan, Ruby Chunn, Sarah Clarke, Holly Bain